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A blog of Radio 4. Not about Radio 4 but of it. We point to the bits we like, the bits you might have missed, the bits that someone might have sneakily recorded. And other bits of speech radio might find their way here too.

Of course, one day this might turn into something else, maybe a new skin for Radio 4, maybe a new way of curating radio, or maybe it won't.

Your hosts on this not very wild ride are Steve Bowbrick, Russell Davies and Roo Reynolds. Drop us a line with your thoughts, unless you wish to complain about continuity announcers and their accents.

Nov
5th
Mon
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Jacques Tati: Everyman Magnified

Jacques Tati as M. Hulot in Mon Oncle

We love Jacques Tati in our house. Well, I suppose it’s mostly me that likes him. My kids put up with him but only because they think he’s a sort of bleached Mr Bean. Mr Bean’s creator Rowan Atkinson makes an appearance in Rory Bremner’s half hour about the French genius - Atkinson reckons Bean isn’t as nice a person as Tati’s creation Hulot.

I like the part about Tati’s pioneering and inventive use of sound: the distinctive (and inexplicably hilarious) sound of that hotel swing door in M. Hulot’s holiday and the quite brilliant ‘silent door’ in Playtime, for instance (MP3, Real)

The pic is a still from Mon Oncle, which I think is the best of Tati’s films.

Steve

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Ten Popes who Shook the World: Paul III

Hey, did you notice we have a new contributor? Roo Reynolds will be chipping in from now on. And Roo’s not just a contributor: he’s our CTO (I think I prefer ‘Chief Engineer’). Of course he has a proper job too. He’s Metaverse Evangelist at IBM. We’re really chuffed to have Roo on the speechification team.

Right, now something for the podcast. If you didn’t catch them when they went out over two weeks in October this lone MP3 won’t help much I suppose. Anyway, Professor Eamon Duffy’s Ten Popes who Shook the World is a thing of beauty: ten fifteen-minute jewels of scholarhip and communication. I grabbed one about Paul III, a tough, political Pontif who started the fightback against those uptight Northern Europeans and their nasty Reformation (MP3). Fascinating.

Steve

Nov
4th
Sun
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Fags, Mags and Bags… again

Speaking of comedy, I want to remind you that tomorrow (that’s Monday) at 11:30 on Radio 4 you can hear the final episode of the first series of the best comedy on the radio right now (if you ask me): Sanjeev Kohli and Donald McLeary’s Fags, Mags and Bags: the surreal sitcom set in a Glasgow sweet shop. My family and I have been laughing like drains more or less continually since the first episode caught us completely by surprise in September.

I also, obviously, want it put on record that Fags, Mags and Bags is speechification’s first official tip for TV transfer in 2008. When the show turns up on the telly, please remember you heard it here first - and if they’ll take bets on this sort of thing at Ladbrokes I’d get round there sharpish. Here’s last week’s episode in case you missed it (MP3).

Steve

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Analysis: One Wales?

It went like this: Matt Jones got a bit excited about the unprecedented collision of Welsh language politics and groovy Catalan network-sociologist Manuel Castells on Analysis. Russell and I noted that the edition he was going on about had been overwritten and whinged a bit about the absence of a proper Analysis archive. I suggested it would be fun to read out a transcript of the show for the speechification podcast.

So I beetled off to find the transcript (a feature of Analysis since before there were podcasts - or web sites for that matter) and found that… there isn’t one. I wrote to the Analysis people wondering where it was and got an apologetic email from (award-winning) series editor Hugh Levinson. Hugh said that the transcripts had been cancelled because they were too expensive but offered me an MP3 of the show.

Bingo, I thought. I told Hugh it was for Speechification and he wrote back with some nice words about Speechification and an MP3. So, with a short delay (and a very BBC bottleneck) I bring you a really fascinating edition of Analysis about the passions and contradictions of indiginous language politics presented by Welshman Mukul Devichand (and featuring cheeky Catalan Manuel Castells) (MP3).

Steve

Nov
3rd
Sat
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Comedy Genius

Although comedy on Radio 4 can be a patchy affair, there’s usually something good on. Mark Watson Makes the World Substantially Better and Armando Iannucci’s Charm Offensive have both finished now, but That Mitchell and Webb Sound started again this week. I’m quietly hoping that Cowards will come back to radio again too.

Recently I’ve particularly been enjoying Dave Gorman's Radio 4 show Genius, now nearing the end of its third series. Imagine the The Halfbakery as a radio show, hosted by Dave Gorman, and you’re most of the way there. (Perhaps unsurprisingly, it turns out that many of the contributors to Genius are themselves ‘bakers too.)

This week’s episode, the penultimate in the series, tickled my ribs greatly. Particularly this suggestion from David Bateman from Liverpool:

Dear Genius,
My idea is to make the Isle of Wight symmetrical. The Isle of Wight is already very nearly symmetrical from east to west anyway, so we will simply perfect this symmetry. This exciting and forward-looking project will give an immense boost to the tourist industry at a surprisingly small cost, and with the destruction of only one major town. Ventnor.

Utter genius. (MP3, Real)

Roo

Oct
31st
Wed
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Mind As Machine

There’s often an interesting bit of speech hidden away on Radio 3, something you stumble over when all other options have been exhausted. This programme about artificial intelligence is just such a thing. A serious, thoughtful and interesting exploration of the 50 years of progress in the field, by Prof Maggie Boden, who actually knows what she’s talking about. I missed the first minute or so, but I don’t think you miss anything essential. (MP3)

russell 

Oct
30th
Tue
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This American Life - Mapping

I love how this is starting to work. Matt Jones emailed us at the weekend about an excellent episode of Excess Baggage about maps. Which we stuck up. Which led Garret Keogh to alert us to this fantastic episode of This American Life, also about maps. If you don’t know This American Life it’s a podcast that’s well worth subscribing too. Easily the best radio programme in the US, possibly in the world. Thanks to everyone for the suggestions.

russell

Oct
29th
Mon
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Work in progress

Here’s a real find. While I was hunting around for links to use in the 'Wrestling for Britain' entry I came across this 2001 page from the Radio 3 archive. Five short programmes from a series called Work in Progress in which George Szirtes, poet, translator - and presenter of the wrestling programme - talks about writing a novel set in the wrestling world (a novel which, unless I’m mistaken - hasn’t yet been published).

I love stuff about the creative process - I’ve often thought of doing a blog about it. Anyway, the Work in Progress pages appear to be a creative process goldmine - although obviously of quite Radio 3-type stuff (lots of poetry and theatre, no video games). Dozens and dozens of Real streams, from people like Roy Strong and Paul Muldoon, Vadim Jean and Ian McEwan.

Pic of George Szirtes from georgeszirtes.co.uk.

Steve 

Oct
28th
Sun
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Wrestling for Britain

Here’s another programme from the archive. I’m not going to go on about it: the programme is just beautiful. It’s a half-hour feature about Tibor Szakacs, a Hungarian exile who came to Britain after the catastrophe of 1956 to make his fortune as a pro wrestler. It’s written and presented by poet and wrestling enthusiast George Szirtes who came to Britain with Szakacs in 1956. It went out in March 2005 (MP3).

Pic from the quite wonderful Wrestling Furnace Picture Gallery.

Steve

Oct
27th
Sat
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Excess Baggage

Matt Jones alerted us to this episode of Excess Baggage, and in particular the feature on atlases. It’s an excellent look at what goes into the making of a map, seen through the latest edition of The Times Atlas, which has had to make 3,000 place name revisions since its last edition; four years ago. And its another Radio 4 programme page with a useful set of links. Great stuff. (MP3)

russell